March 30, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 3:24 pm

Egyptian boats update http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=626910

Archaeologists have found the remains of boats used by ancient Egyptians for trading trips, the culture minister said in comments published on Wednesday.

The boats were discovered in caves in a pharaonic harbour on Egypt’s Red Sea coast around 300 miles southeast of Cairo, Farouk Hosni said in comments carried by Egypt’s state MENA news agency

They were used to transport goods to and from the Land of Punt, he said. The Land of Punt, mentioned in ancient Egyptian writings, is thought by most archaeologists to be the coast of the Horn of Africa.

“Excavations discovered a group of sail and mast ropes, wooden ship beams and thin planks made of cedars, imported from northern Syria,” MENA quoted Zahi Hawas, chairman of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, as saying.

Hawas said a team from Boston University in the United States working with an Italian team had made the discovery.

That’s the whole thing.

FORMER PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER A CONVICTED FELON. . .almost Archaeology seminar works to harmonize history, development

Residential developers were urged to be proactive in protecting both the graves of ancient peoples and their own economic interests by representatives of tribal, federal and state agencies during a seminar organized by the Coolidge Growth Management office.
City Planner Sue Laybourn brought together five speakers and 23 representatives of 12 developers and engineering firms, along with about 30 others, for five hours of presentations by representatives of the Gila River Indian Community, the Ak-Chin Indian Community, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Arizona State Museum.

Read down a bit for the Carter stuff. Nice article explaining various ins and outs of the effects of development on archaeological resources in Arizona.

Rare statue displayed at Israel Museum

A centuries-old statue of Venus, headless but vibrant with color and detail, went on display Wednesday at the Israel Museum, a decade after it was discovered in northern Israel.

The life-size marble work represents one of the most important discoveries of Roman sculpture in the world, said James Snyder, director of the museum.

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 11:26 am

Sorry about the day off. We were attempting to install a new door in our spacious metropolitan offices. Did you know that a single wood door can weigh approximately the same as a small yacht? Swear to God it’s true. Especially when the hinges don’t quite line up right.

Nuclear Analysis Reveals Secrets Of Inca Burial Site

Researchers have applied a unique nuclear analytic technique to pottery found at an ancient burial site high in the Andes mountains, and believe that the girl buried at this site was transported more than 600 miles in a ceremonial pilgrimage – revealing some customs and rituals of the ancient Inca empire.

The findings are being published by scientists from Oregon State University in the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology.

On the highest peaks of the Andes, sacrificial burial sites have been discovered since the early 1900s. In one of them was the fully intact, frozen body of a girl who was sacrificed at age 15, called “The Ice Maiden,” and buried more than five centuries ago along with various vessels – in what appeared to be one of the ritualistic ceremonies of that era.

Interesting. But we wonder what linking evidence was made to support the notion that both the pottery and the person had their origins at the same place.


Academics suggest Irish travellers are remnant of pre-Celtic culture

Irish travellers, long derided as anti-social itinerants rather than “true” Gypsies, are an ancient people in their own right, researchers say.

. . .

Research by an Irish socio-linguist, Dr Alice Binchy, suggests that more than half the surviving Cant/Gammon lexicon may be derived from a long-lost language spoken in Ireland before the Celts arrived. “A partially pre-Celtic origin would have substantial implications for the way we look not only at traveller history, but at early Irish history as a whole,” said Dr Binchy, a delegate at a conference of linguists, historians and anthropologists to be held at the University of Limerick.

HADRIAN’S WALL COULD LINK WITH PAST FRONTIER

THE FRONTIERS of the Roman empire could be resurrected under plans to join Hadrian’s Wall with the chain of forts and walls across Europe in one World Heritage Site.

Such a move could create a European rival to the Great Wall of China and a major boost to tourism in Cumbria.

An Anglo-German bid will be considered by the World Heritage Committee in July to create a new heritage site called Frontiers of the Roman Empire.

Upshot: Make the whole length of the Roman frontier a single World Heritage site.

Heh. “St. Pete” St Pete researchers find tattoos on ancient Siberian mummies

Infrared photography methods, used for the first time by researchers at the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, have made it possible to discover tattoos in ancient mummies excavated in the Pazyryk mounds in the south Siberian Altai Mountains.

The mounds date back to the 8th to 5th centuries BC.

The discovery was made on three mummies – two that used to be female bodies and one male body — that were produced by special treatment for burial ceremonies.

We thought we’d heard of something similar before and we were right: From various docs on TV regarding other Siberian mummies, notably the Ice Maiden from several years back.

They’re not made out of bratwurst The Dragon in the Lake — New Book Reveals Latest Research on the Ancient Underwater Pyramids in Wisconsin

In the cold murky depths of a Wisconsin lake lay mysterious rock structures wrapped in Native American folklore and local legend. These ancient underwater manmade structures may be the most significant and controversial North American archeological discovery of the twentieth century. In Archie Eschborn’s fascinating new book The Dragon in the Lake, you will follow a small band of amateur archeologists led by Eschborn himself as they reveal new research opening up a new chapter in prehistoric North American history and ending decades of controversy on North America’s most sacred and secret native American site.

Looked kinda fishy (heh, no pun intended) when we first started reading this, and it seems we were correct in our initial assessment. Seems to be typical hyperbolic fluff, full of exciting! adjectives regarding the explosive! nature of the findings and the soon-to-be-nigh collapse of the status quo. So anyway, you can read more about it here.

Fraud? Ptolemy Tilted Off His Axis

In a sunlit gallery of the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Italy, astronomer Brad Schaefer came face to face with an ancient statue known as the Farnese Atlas.

For centuries, the 7-foot marble figure of the mythological Atlas has bent in stoic agony with a sphere of the cosmos crushing his shoulders.

. . .

But as Schaefer approached, he began to notice subtle details in the arrangement of the constellations. It wasn’t that anything was wrong with the statue. If anything, the positions of the constellations were too perfect to be mere decoration.

This is only vaguely archaeological and rather out of our purview to evaluate with any real confidence, but it sounds interesting.

Antiquities Market update

In the span of just a few months, three museums featuring rare Indian artifacts have been plundered, leaving authorities looking for the culprits and culture aficionados mourning the loss.

For the tribes involved, the loss cuts much deeper.

The first theft happened in California on Christmas Eve of last year as thieves entered the Daggett Museum in Barstow and spirited away just about all of the Indian-themed displays. The stolen items included a $2,500 Navajo wedding basket, arrowheads, American Indian baskets, pottery and more.


Gold love ring is treasure trove

A collection of artefacts dating from the Bronze Age to the 1600s has been declared treasure by a coroner’s court in Cardiff.

The items were found over the course of 18 months at various sites in the Vale of Glamorgan, south Wales.

They included a gold Elizabethan ring with the inscription “Let Liking Last” on its inner rim, found near the ruins of a manor house in Llantrithyd.

March 28, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 1:49 pm

Old Chinese camp unearthed in N.Z.

An archaeological dig in Lawrence, a small town on the South Island of New Zealand, has unearthed an old Chinese camp and found a number of historical treasures, local media reported Monday.

A archaeologists team is working on a remote Otago paddock which was once New Zealand’s largest Chinese camp. The site was the gateway to the Otago gold fields, the team said.

Thousands of Chinese people went overseas to Otago as gold field labors in 1860s, start of the Chinese immigration to New Zealand.

James ossuary update II The Stone Box

(CBS) Correspondent Bob Simon has a story about the Bible and truth. More precisely, it’s about Biblical antiquities and how they can be seen to prove that the stories told in the Bible really happened.

For the last couple of years, the world of biblical archaeology was rocked to its foundations, and all because of a stone box that was discovered in Israel.

The box was an ossuary, an object used to hold the bones of the dead approximately 2,000 years ago, in the time of Jesus.

Seems to be either a transcript or a summary article on a 60 Minutes story on the box. Link to the actual video, too.

Granite Falls bypass’s price rising

With each month and each year that passes, the price tag for the Granite Falls alternate route goes up.

An updated estimate for a planned two-mile alternate route for gravel trucks to bypass downtown now puts the cost at $24.8 million. It is scheduled to be completed by 2009, said Steve Dickson, assistant director of Snohomish County Public Works.

That cost is several million dollars more than estimated in recent years. Dickson attributed the increase mostly to inflation. A design report last fall also better identified the project’s needs, he said.

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 1:49 pm

Old Chinese camp unearthed in N.Z.

An archaeological dig in Lawrence, a small town on the South Island of New Zealand, has unearthed an old Chinese camp and found a number of historical treasures, local media reported Monday.

A archaeologists team is working on a remote Otago paddock which was once New Zealand’s largest Chinese camp. The site was the gateway to the Otago gold fields, the team said.

Thousands of Chinese people went overseas to Otago as gold field labors in 1860s, start of the Chinese immigration to New Zealand.

James ossuary update II The Stone Box

(CBS) Correspondent Bob Simon has a story about the Bible and truth. More precisely, it’s about Biblical antiquities and how they can be seen to prove that the stories told in the Bible really happened.

For the last couple of years, the world of biblical archaeology was rocked to its foundations, and all because of a stone box that was discovered in Israel.

The box was an ossuary, an object used to hold the bones of the dead approximately 2,000 years ago, in the time of Jesus.

Seems to be either a transcript or a summary article on a 60 Minutes story on the box. Link to the actual video, too.

Granite Falls bypass’s price rising

With each month and each year that passes, the price tag for the Granite Falls alternate route goes up.

An updated estimate for a planned two-mile alternate route for gravel trucks to bypass downtown now puts the cost at $24.8 million. It is scheduled to be completed by 2009, said Steve Dickson, assistant director of Snohomish County Public Works.

That cost is several million dollars more than estimated in recent years. Dickson attributed the increase mostly to inflation. A design report last fall also better identified the project’s needs, he said.

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 11:45 am

News from Egypt I Ancient trade-route stopover point discovered

A team of Egyptian excavators have recently uncovered the remains of stables, barracks and storehouses at Tel Al Sabha, 88 kilometres southeast of Al Arish. This once acted as a stopover point on the ancient trade route that linked Arabia with Gaza and Arish.
The route was in use between 200 BC and 50 AD, said Dr Zahi Hawas, secretary-general of the Supreme Council for Antiquities (SCA). He explained that several routes serving military, trade and religious purposes crossed Sinai in order to link Egypt with Sham and Hijaz. The oldest of these routes was the old military road known as Horus.

News from Egypt II Tête-à-tête with the French explorers

Today at sunset Culture Minister Farouk Hosni, Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) Secretary-General Zahi Hawass, French Cultural Attaché Denis Louche and senior French and Egyptian officials and archaeologists are schudled to attend the opening of the special exhibition “Champollion, Legrain… Treading the Land of Egypt” at the centennial hall of the Egyptian Museum.

The exhibition has come to Cairo after six months in the capital of the French Alps, Grenoble, where it marked the centenary of Egyptologist George Legrain’s famous discovery of the Karnak Cachet. It also coincides with the ninth International Congress of Egyptologists.

Two sarcophagi found at construction site

During construction of the new Aliağa customs building, two sarcophagi containing gold necklaces from the Hellenistic period, dating back to 500-400 B.C., were found.

Local Aliağa administrator Emir Osman Bulgurlu stated that archeologists were drafting a report on the find and depending on the outcome they would know whether the area would be considered a third degree historic and natural protection site. He added that the findings would be delivered to the İzmir Archaeology Museum Directorate.

Aliağa Mayor Tansu Kaya said they were waiting for a positive Cabinet decision indicating that construction could proceed.

That’s the whole thing.

Biblical Archaeology update Cashbox: An ossuary supposedly linked to Jesus was a windfall for a Canadian museum. Now Israel has declared it a fake and jailed its promoter, and the museum has some explaining to do.

The man accused of standing at the centre of the greatest forgery ring of our time, perhaps all time, doesn’t appear to be holding up so well. In books and movies, criminal masterminds — the label Israeli police are freely applying to Oded Golan — are effortlessly suave, or carelessly brutal, confident in the extreme. In real life, this 54-year-old antiquities collector seems as brittle as the Bible-era vases and figurines that fill the display cases in his otherwise modest Tel Aviv apartment. On the white message board in his kitchen, a female friend has left a long list of life instructions: “Go to bed on time. Try to get 8 hours of sleep. Don’t be nervous. Drive carefully, do up your seatbelt. Don’t eat too much chocolate or cheese. You should smile at least 15 times a day.” Everything will be fine, it concludes.

Long review of the events surrounding the James ossuary.

A mammoth discovery Construction crew unearths apparent mammoth bones near Selah

A construction crew has unearthed what appear to be mammoth bones at least 10,000 years old north of this central Washington town and northeast of Yakima, the company owner says.

Gary Fife of Selah said he and his crew were on lunch while building a private road about three weeks ago when he noticed some large bones protruding from an embankment near where they had been digging.

At the request of the property owner, an archaeologist from Seattle made some initial tests which indicated the bones probably belong to a species of mammoth, Fife said.

Not sure how big of a find this is. In the news footage we saw there were only a couple of bone fragments, about enough to fill a standard shovel. We’ll have to wait to see if more of the skeleton turns up.

USC plans archeological conference on early Americans

The University of South Carolina is planning a major archaeological conference on the heels of findings at a dig in Allendale County that suggest humans may have arrived in North America earlier than previously thought.

Professor Al Goodyear said the Oct. 26-29 conference will include discussion of the controversy over when humans first arrived on the continent. But its primary topic is Clovis culture in the Southeast.

Tsunami update Look what the tsunami’s dragged in

Cataclysmic waves caused historic losses on Asian shores on Boxing Day, but Indian archaeologists are crediting the tsunami for a monumental find. The sea has given back relics which were lost for centuries.

The tsunami’s mighty backwash has shifted thousands of tonnes of sand to unearth a pair of elaborately carved stone lions, the guardians of an ancient port city less than a kilometre off the coast of Tamil Nadu.

The two-metre-high statues, each hewn from a single piece of granite, appear breathtakingly lifelike. One great cat sits up alert while the other is poised to pounce.

Nothing really new here, just a short review of various tsunami/archaeology stories.

Really, we do more than just wander Wandering among the ruins

As the weather warms up, archaeologists come out to raise awareness about Arizona and its heritage.

During March, Arizona State Parks has been featuring more than 100 prehistoric and historic sites, tours, exhibits, hikes, open houses, lectures and demonstrations and other activities throughout the state, including a Children’s Rock Art Exhibit in the West Valley.

Some sites are being destroyed by looting and new developments, and this event is one way to raise awareness.

U.P. history unfolds through archeological artifacts

Jim Paquette thinks it’s important for Upper Peninsula residents to know the history of the region and its people, especially since the people date back 11,000 years.

Paquette explained his archeological findings over the last 20 years in a slide presentation titled, “My Search for Early Man in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula,” sponsored by the Forsyth Township Historical Society Wednesday.

Paquette – a Negaunee resident, 1974 graduate of Northern Michigan University and employee of Cleveland Cliffs Inc. – has been excavating local prehistoric American Indian sites since 1984 and his efforts have resulted in evidence of the earliest occupation in the U.P.

Treasure! Gibraltar clash over £2bn treasure

The Strait of Gibraltar has been the scene of numerous skirmishes between the British and Spanish navies, and now the two nations are sparring again – this time over the wreck of an English warship packed to the gunwales with treasure.

HMS Sussex has lain undisturbed on the seabed for more than 300 years, but since researchers discovered the ship was carrying billions of pounds of English gold and silver, it has become the focus of a bitter dispute as the Spanish authorities try to frustrate the attempts of a private company to locate it and start salvage work on behalf of Britain.

Article continues
International law gives UK authorities jurisdiction over the wrecks of British ships wherever they might lie, and this month the UK government gave permission to an American exploration company, Odyssey Marine Exploration, to salvage the Sussex.

Archaeoastronomy update Scientists Study Anasazi Calender

Don Smith, College of Eastern Utah, San Juan branch: “I think we’re becoming more aware that those people were far more familiar with astronomy, science and possibly math than we give them credit for.”

In a secluded ravine near Blanding, scientists and researchers gather to watch mysterious images forming right before their eyes.

Although the rite of Spring, at least on our calendar, slipped in here yesterday almost unnoticed, it’s literally in your face in this strange little canyon.

We think the “science and possibly math” might be stretching it a bit, as these require symbolic representation and rule-based reasoning that is pretty much absent from the material remains (and who knows what was going on inside their heads). Empirical generalization along with trial-and-error engineering can go a long way towards accomplishing the same goals, and persistence and ingenuity is what we really don’t give ancient people enough credit for.

March 26, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 11:03 am

News from the EEF

Press report: “Hand writing center follows unique line”
http://www.sis.gov.eg/online/html12/o170325y.htm
“The Handwriting Centre, affiliated to Bibliotheca Alexandrina, is the first centre of its kind to take an interest in all types of hand writings through all ages from pre-historic until modern times. The
center’s short plan includes an exhibition for writing in Egypt throughout ages.”

Press report: “AEARC’s valuable work”
http://www.sis.gov.eg/online/html12/o170325x.htm
About the Ancient Egyptian Art Revival Centre, affiliated with the SCA, that aims at producing replicas and drawings of ancient art.

Press report: “Students mummify birds. Class helps explain Egyptian practice”.
http://snipurl.com/dmyo
“Melissa Saad’s sixth-grade classes at Mariner Middle School got up-close and personal with the ancient Egyptian practice of mummification this year. As part of their social studies class, students mummified chickens.” [Lets hope the Curses of King Cluck and Queen Chickapatra will not go haunt the school's soccer field...;)]

Melissa Terras, “Towards a Reading of the Vindolanda Stylus Tablets – Engineering Science and the Papyrologist”, in: Human IT 2-3/2000. In HTML.
http://www.hb.se/bhs/ith/23-00/mt.htm#kap4
About “a collaborative project between the Department of Engineering Science and the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents at the University of Oxford regarding the analysis and reading of the Vindolanda Stylus
Tablets. We sketch the imaging and image processing techniques used to digitally capture and analyse the tablets, the development of the image analysis tools to aid papyrologists in the transcription of the texts, and
lessons that can be learned so far from such an inter-disciplinary project.”

Online version of: M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Ian Barnes, Matthew J. Collins, Colin Smith, Julie Eklund, Jaap Goudsmit, Hendrik Poinar, Alan Cooper, Long-Term Survival of Ancient DNA in Egypt: Response to Zink and Nerlich (2003), in: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 126 (2005), article online in advance of print – 5 pp., pdf-file: 70 KB
http://snipurl.com/dmyw
“We … wish to reassert the premise that in most, if not all, ancient Egyptian remains, aDNA does not survive to a level that is currently retrievable.”

See also the thesis of M. Thomas P. Gilbert, An Assessment of the Use of Human Samples in Ancient DNA Studies, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, 2003 with a chapter “The long-term survival of ancient DNA in
Egypt”, pp. 237-248 – (12), 327 pp., pdf-file: 9.3 MB http://eebweb.arizona.edu/PostDocs/Gilbert/tom_web/papers/Gilbert_thesis.pdf
“This thesis addresses gaps that exist in the theory and knowledge of ancient DNA (aDNA). Much of the underlying basis of the field has been neglected in the excitement that followed the first aDNA studies. Therefore the results of many studies have been based on untested assumptions about the nature of post mortem DNA damage, sample preservation, contamination, and the efficacy of sample decontamination techniques. The validity of such results is questionable if the assumptions prove false.”

Online version of: Albert R. Zink, Andreas G. Nerlich, Long-Term Survival of Ancient DNA in Egypt: Reply to Gilbert et al., in: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 126 (2005), article online in advance of print – 4 pp., pdf-file: 60 KB
http://eebweb.arizona.edu/PostDocs/Gilbert/tom_web/papers/Zink_Nerlich05.pdf
“On a theoretical basis, they [Marota et al.] had calculated an upper limit for aDNA preservation in ancient Egyptian biomaterial of about 700-800 years. They suggested that any molecular research on ancient Egyptian DNA
would be meaningless, as no retrievable aDNA can be expected. In our comment on that paper, we identified several points that indicated a significantly better preservation of Egyptian aDNA than had been assumed by Marota et al.”

End of EEF news

March 25, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 10:43 am

No posts yesterday since Blogger was being spastic most of the morning and then we were busy the remainder of the day.

First a Great Wall, now a Long Wall New Geophysic Studies on the Longest Wall of Ancient Iran

Archaeologists have innitiated a new series of geophysic studies in the immediate vicinity of the ancient wall of Gorgan, to uncover yet unknown architectural remains of the area.

The wall, located in the nothern province of Golestan is considered the longest historical wall of Iran, and the second longest in Asia after the world-famous ancient wall of China. Some believe that the two walls were built at the same period as fortifications against northern invaders.

NNEFTA?* Did Use of Free Trade Cause Neanderthal Extinction?

Economics-free trade may have contributed to the extinction of Neanderthals 30,000-40,000 years ago, according to a paper published in the “Journal of Economic Organization and Behavior.”

“After at least 200,000 years of eking out an existence in glacial Eurasia, the Neanderthal suddenly went extinct,” writes University of Wyoming economist Jason Shogren, along with colleagues Richard Horan of Michigan State University and Erwin Bulte from Tilburg University in the Netherlands. “Early modern humans arriving on the scene shortly before are suspected to have been the perpetrator, but exactly how they caused Neanderthal extinction is unknown.”

Creating a new kind of caveman economics in their published paper, they argue early modern humans were first to exploit the competitive edge gained from specialization and free trade. With more reliance on free trade, humans increased their activities in culture and technology, while simultaneously out-competing Neanderthals on their joint hunting grounds, the economists say.

This seems interesting in that it treats whole areas as functional bits of a whole rather than a large number of functionally redundant units, somewhat analogous to the switch from colonial organisms to those with true functional specializations.

* Non-Neanderthal Eurasian Free Trade Agreement

Ancient city of Pedasa to rise from the ruins

A plan has been initiated for new excavations in the ancient city of Pedasa, located eight kilometers from Bodrum in the small town of Konacık, reported the Doğan News Agency.

Pedasa was an important Leleg city located near Mt. Gökçeler that enjoyed its heyday between the 11th and sixth centuries B.C. and where a copper needle and various artifacts and jewelry dating back 3,000 years were found last year in a royal tomb.

Non-archaeological but still way cool Preserved soft tissue found in dinosaur bone

Scientists who had to break a dinosaur bone to remove it from its sandstone location say they have recovered 70-million-year-old soft tissue from inside the bone.

The find included what appear to be blood vessels, and possibly even cells, from a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

The material is currently being studied, and if scientists can isolate proteins from the material they may be able to learn new details of how dinosaurs lived, lead researcher Mary Higby Schweitzer of North Carolina State University said.

From what we’ve been reading on this it’s not all that rare, except for large critters because paleontologists are somewhat loathe to bust up bones.

March 24, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 9:30 am

Well. Just this one item so far. Diddly going on today, archaeology-wise.

Egyptian boats Remains of ancient Egyptian seafaring ships discovered

The first remains of ancient Egyptian seagoing ships ever to be recovered have been found in two caves on Egypt’s Red Sea coast, according to a team at Boston University in the US.

The team also found fragments of pottery at the site, which could help resolve controversies about the extent of ancient Egyptian trade voyages. But details of the newly disclosed finds remain sketchy.

Kathryn Bard, who co-led the dig with Italian archaeologists in December 2004, has revealed to the Boston University weekly community newsletter that the team found a range of items – including timbers and riggings – inside the man-made caves, located at the coastal Pharaonic site of Wadi Gawasis.

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 9:30 am

Well. Just this one item so far. Diddly going on today, archaeology-wise.

Egyptian boats Remains of ancient Egyptian seafaring ships discovered

The first remains of ancient Egyptian seagoing ships ever to be recovered have been found in two caves on Egypt’s Red Sea coast, according to a team at Boston University in the US.

The team also found fragments of pottery at the site, which could help resolve controversies about the extent of ancient Egyptian trade voyages. But details of the newly disclosed finds remain sketchy.

Kathryn Bard, who co-led the dig with Italian archaeologists in December 2004, has revealed to the Boston University weekly community newsletter that the team found a range of items – including timbers and riggings – inside the man-made caves, located at the coastal Pharaonic site of Wadi Gawasis.

March 23, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — admin @ 2:49 pm

Clap her in irons! Temple tempest
TOURISTS: HANDS OFF THE ANTIQUITIES!

A B.C. schoolgirl’s hands-on contact with ancient Greece has guardians of Toronto’s historic sites reviewing their security defences. Madeleine Gierc, freed from an Athens prison yesterday, learned the hard way that handling a 13-cm-square piece of marble — even for a Kodak moment — is a no-no at the Parthenon.

The 16-year-old was arrested on Sunday while posing for a snapshot at the 2,500-year-old temple at the Acropolis.

Guards reacted as fast as Hermes, the messenger of the Greek gods, when they saw her with the shard.

Note to famous directors: Do NOT make a movie about this place Kernave: Lithuania’s ‘Troy’ to celebrate UNESCO heritage site listing

Few countries are so fortunate as to have an archaeological treasure trove preserving 10 millennia of human settlement. A discovery so impressive that it bears comparison to the Greek city of Troy, which had been consigned to myth until late nineteenth-century archaeologists dug up a hill in Turkey proving its existence, and showing that a stack of eight cities had been built on top.

In the 1970s, Lithuanian archaeologists began following up rumours of a magnificent ancient city, stumbling across a site about 35 km from Vilnius unscathed by war and industrial development, which many now call Lithuania’s first capital – Kernave.

Homo hobittus update Fresh Scandal Over Old Bones

Inside Liang Bua cave on the Indonesian island of Flores, the bones of the hobbit rested undisturbed for 18,000 years.

But no longer.

In what is being called a true case of scientific skullduggery, the remains of the newly discovered human species have suffered irreparable damage since entering the care of paleontologists.

Seems to have a lot more detail on what sort of damage the bones sustained, Smeagol Jacob’s response, and other tidbits.

Davids Island preservation

The Army Corps of Engineers expects to agree with New Rochelle and state officials by June on how to spare historically significant buildings of a former military post on Davids Island while tearing down the rest.

As presented last night by Nancy Brighton, lead archaeologist in the corps’ New York office, the preservation plan would reach a final draft by May and would be signed in June by the corps, the city, New York state Historic Preservation Office and other interested organizations and agencies.

By June or July, the Army hopes to begin demolishing buildings on the island that are believed to be free of asbestos and determined to have no historic value because they are too far deteriorated to help a visitor understand the history of the long-abandoned Fort Slocum. Some of the items listed as buildings are ruins crumbled beyond recognition.

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