June 15, 2015

The latest in fermented fish sauce

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 2:08 pm

Apparently, I’ve been using one for years (at least in part): Worcestershire sauce (contains anchovies).

June 10, 2015

In a topless bar?

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:24 pm

The mystery of the headless skeleton revealed by Crossrail

Of all the discoveries an archaeologist could make, this has to be one of the more gruesome. Twenty feet beneath Liverpool Street, in the heart of the City of London, excavators recently uncovered a human skeleton deprived of its head. The skull had been placed between the victim’s legs.
The mysterious remains, which date from the Roman period, were dug up as part of the Crossrail project, a £15 billion scheme to establish a 26-mile rail network across the capital. And they are just one of several grim artefacts that are challenging long-held beliefs about Roman Britain, shedding light on ancient Celtic practices and terrifying Roman customs.
As well as the headless skeleton, a team from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) has found several skulls in a neat row alongside a tree-lined Roman road.

(Reference)

June 8, 2015

Did you know. . . .

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 12:25 pm

that it’s the International Year of the Gibbon?

Perhaps my favorite ape.

June 4, 2015

So, kinda like Miami in the ’80s. . . .

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:44 pm

Gold Artifacts Tell Tale of Drug-Fueled Rituals and “Bastard Wars”

The chamber contained two bucket-shaped gold vessels, each placed upside down. Inside were three gold cups, a heavy gold finger ring, two neck rings, and a gold bracelet. In all, the well-preserved gold artifacts weighed nearly seven pounds (3.2 kilos).

“It was definitely a surprise for us,” Belinski says. “We weren’t expecting to find anything like this.” (Read about another excavation of a Scythian kurgan and its gold.)

Belinski asked criminologists in nearby Stavropol to analyze a black residue inside the vessels. The results came back positive for opium and cannabis, confirming a practice first reported by Herodotus. The Greek historian claimed that the Scythians used a plant to produce smoke “that no Grecian vapour-bath can surpass … transported by the vapor, [they] shout aloud.”

Life mostly sucked then so anything to make you feel good.

Not just banging on rocks

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:32 pm

5,000-year old seal shows oldest-known musical image found in Israel

A unique seal impression found half a century ago in the western Galilee bears the oldest-known depiction of music ever found in Israel, according to a new interpretation of the find.

Archaeologists now believe the scene shows the musical part of a ritual dating back 5,000 years, of the “sacred marriage” between the Mesopotamian king and a goddess, whose role would have been played by a priestess.

Found in Early Bronze Age ruins in Beit Haemek in the 1970s, the impression was made using a cylinder seal rolled along the surface of clay before it was fired, creating repeating designs. It shows two standing women and one sitting, who is playing a musical instrument that is, apparently, a lyre.

I’d be willing to bet that some form of music — at least banging and singing — was developing right along with language.

June 2, 2015

Something you’ve probably never heard of before

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:10 pm

Paphos’ Venus Victrix

SHE is headless, wears no clothes and has lost her sword. She is unique. So much so that many rank the armed Aphrodite of Paphos among the most important women of Cyprus.

Now, for the first time since her discovery, the Paphos’ Venus Victrix has travelled from her ancient home to the capital where she is the star of a new exhibition, entitled ‘Nea Paphos: 50 Years of Polish Excavations, 1965-2015′ which opens tomorrow at the Cyprus Archaeological Museum.

I just linked that because it was something I’d never known existed. Plus I really have a latent passion for Cypriot archaeology. I think if there were one place I could go work at as sort of “vacation archaeology”, I’d go to Cyprus.

May 27, 2015

And more death!

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:27 pm

Archaeologists Track the Birth, Life, and Death of the 3,000-Year-Old Egtved Girl

They call her Egtved Girl, after the small town in Denmark where her body was discovered back in 1921. Today, through the analysis of strontium isotopes recovered from the girl’s teeth, hair, nails, and clothing, researchers Karin Frei, from the National Museum of Denmark, and Kristian Kristiansen, from the University of Gothenburg, are able to determine where the girl originated and the area she travelled in the years leading up to her death.

. . .

They call her Egtved Girl, after the small town in Denmark where her body was discovered back in 1921. Today, through the analysis of strontium isotopes recovered from the girl’s teeth, hair, nails, and clothing, researchers Karin Frei, from the National Museum of Denmark, and Kristian Kristiansen, from the University of Gothenburg, are able to determine where the girl originated and the area she travelled in the years leading up to her death.

She was actually found in the 1920s, but only now were these analyses done.

There are, of course, several artist’s conceptions of what Egtved Girl may have looked like:
From the slightly dated:
Desert Fox

To the tarty:
Desert Fox

To the even more dated (but probably more realistic):
Desert Fox

The creepy. . . . .
Desert Fox

And the hot corpsy look:
Desert Fox

First death, now taxes!

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:12 pm

Archaeologists discover ‘earliest tax exiles in history’ – in Hereford

Experts examined the remains of thousands of bodies around the 12th century cathedral as part of an extensive two-year-old project to restore the area.
A study of teeth belonging to its oldest residents showed the majority of men were immigrants from Normandy or North Wales, while all the women were local.
Historians investigating the surprising results then found a statute from the era, post-Norman Conquest, which dictated that any man moving to the area who married a local woman did not have to pay taxes.

Actually death and taxes together. But remember, white people only dig up and poke around non-European bodies.

May 26, 2015

Okay, dumb. . . .and odd. . .and cool, all at the same time

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:37 pm

Archaeologists find first dinosaur fossil in Washington

That’s the dumb part; you know, the usual reason.

Paleontologists from the University of Washington’s Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture have reportedly located the first dinosaur fossil ever discovered in that state: A fossil described by the team as the partial left femur of a two-legged carnivorous theropod.

UW researchers Dr. Brandon Peecook and Dr. Christian Sidor, who detailed their findings in a paper published in the journal PLOS One, made the discovery while collecting fossils along the shores of Sucia Island State Park in the San Juan Islands.

The duo was collecting fossils of ammonites (nautilus-like creatures) at a marine rock area called the Cedar District Formation when they found a 16.7 inches long, 8.7 inch wide fragment of bone that they believe would have been more than three feet long when complete. It belonged to an approximately 80-million-year-old dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period.

Someone mentioned this the other day and I was skeptical since most of the rocks out on the San Juans are volcanic/metamorphosed and covered with post-pleistocene junk (that;s the odd part). So huh. But cool. I didn’t think there were dinosaurs around here.

At least not for the last couple of decades. . . . .

With fava beans and a nice chiaaaanti, duh.

Filed under: Uncategorized — acagle @ 7:22 pm

(Damn, Kristina beat me to it)
Ancient Mesoamerican Recipe For Cooking Human Flesh Decoded By Archaeologists

In an article just published in the journal Archaeometry, researchers Aioze Trujillo-Mederos, Pedro Bosch , Carmen Pijoan, and Josefina Mansilla used a suite of chemical and physical techniques to answer these questions. Specifically, many of the bones had a yellow or red tinge to them and the archaeologists wanted to know “whether the Tlatelcomila bones were treated at a low temperature, if they were intentionally coloured, or if the colour results from a particular cooking procedure.” Using powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, they took a close look at samples of the human bones.

Based on the results of the chemical analysis, Trujillo-Mederos and colleagues showed not only that all of the bones were cooked, but also that some were grilled while some were boiled. “Both boiling and grilling were used in Mesoamerican ritual anthropophagy [or cannibalism],” the authors write, so finding both forms of cooking in the same assemblage of bone was not too surprising.

I am totally not the one to write articles like this as I would be try out the recipes myself.

Wel, errrr, you know, pork or something.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Powered by WordPress